The Dell Latitude 5285: A hybrid tablet primed for business

No, it’s not just you. The Dell Latitude 5285 hybrid is a dead ringer for the Microsoft Surface Pro 4. But while Microsoft targets consumers and businesses with its Surface Pro 4, Dell has honed its Latitude 5285 2-in-1 for the enterprise, forgoing features aimed at entertainment in favor of performance, security, and connectivity enhancements that may just have businesses sold on the hybrid “tabtop” concept.

Design

On the surface, the Latitude 5285 is an unabashed clone of Microsoft’s hybrid. That’s not a bad thing, given the Surface Pro 4’s solid design. And where it differs, with its brushed metal finish in carbon black and its sleeker contours, the Latitude 5285 looks and feels like an upgrade over the now-tired design of the Surface Pro 4.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more 0 Comments

How the old pro does it

Flashback to the 1990s, when this IT pilot fish at a manufacturing plant has suddenly had server administration added to his job of setting up workstations and servers.”I had been dropped into the server admin position without formal training, and a…

Read more 0 Comments

WebAssembly wins! Google pulls plug on PNaCl

For Google, it is time to ring out the old and ring in the new when it comes to running native code in the browser. To this end, Google is making the WebAssembly portable code format its solution for native code going forward, displacing the company’s Portable Native Client (PNaCl).

PNaCl lacked the desired cross-browser compatibility offered by WebAssembly, the company said. PNaCl support will be removed early next year except in Chrome Apps and Extensions. Google said usage of PNACl is low enough to warrant deprecation and that WebAssembly has a vibrant ecosystem, making it a better fit. “Historically, running native code on the web required a browser plugin. In 2013, we introduced the PNaCl sandbox to provide a means of building safe, portable, high-performance apps without plugins,” Google’s Brad Nelson, software engineer on NaCl, PNaCl, and WebAssembly, said. “Although this worked well in Chrome, it did not provide a solution that worked seamlessly across all browsers.”

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Read more 0 Comments